FACULTY

Jennifer Smith, PhD

Assistant Professor of English


College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Smith teaches American Literature; Development of the English Novel; Plague, Pox, Zombies: Contagion in Literature, Law, and Film; Writing about Literature; The Noetic Experience through the Humanities. Her areas of expertise includes 19th and 20th century American literature and culture; gender, race and ethnicity; narrative theory and genre studies. Dr. Smith also teaches in the Women's and Gender Studies program.

Her current project, Provisional Identities: The American Short-Story Cycle, places the short-story cycle at the center of American literary history. For nearly two hundred years, the cycle, composed of independent yet interconnected stories, fostered the aesthetics of fragmentation and recurrence, which characterize modern and contemporary fiction.

Dr. Smith serves as the University's English Club Advisor. She has been a member of Concordia’s faculty since 2010.

Degrees

  • PhD, Indiana University; Bloomington, Ind.
  • MA, English literature, Indiana University; Bloomington, Ind.
  • BA, English literature and German, Ball State University; Muncie, Ind.

Academic and Professional Highlights

Publications:

  • "Teaching the Short-Story Cycle, Teaching American Literature," forthcoming in Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture. 
  • "Writing Ritual, Resisting Resolution: The Short Story Cycles of Hemingway and Steinbeck," Short Fiction in Theory & Practice 3.2 (2013): 175–191.
  • “Sherwood Anderson and the Contemporary Short-Story Cycle” and "Making the Bilungsroman New," forthcoming in Rodopi Dialogue Series: Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio. Ed. Precious McKenzie Stearns.
  • “Locating the Short-Story Cycle,” in The Journal of the Short Story in English 57 (2011): 59-79.
  • "Born in the Workshop: The MFA and the Short-Story Cycle," Triquarterly Online, Jan. 2012
  • "Dean Young's Fall Higher," Indiana Review, 33.2 (2012)
  • “Birthed and Buried: Matrilineal History in Michelle Cliff’s No Telephone to Heaven,” Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalisim, 9.1, (2009): 141-162.

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